Permission Policy

Our Vision is to research, organize, and share valuable knowledge in an “open-source” format that advances the studies on entrepreneurship, and bridges the gap between theory and practice. Non-profit and educational organizations around the world are encouraged to leverage our ideas, our information, and our online support to advance and support entrepreneurship. Our work has been cited in key papers, articles, and numerous research studies around the world. Our Web site is recognized as one of the best resources on the Internet for entrepreneurs, academia, and researchers around the world.

Credits and citations may appear with the material, in a separate acknowledgments section, for example at the beginning or end of the chapter in which the material appears; or in a separate acknowledgments section in the front or the back of the book or materials.

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Copyright Notice

This World Wide Web site (“Web site”) is created by and Copyright 2015 by the Global Entrepreneurship Institute and GCASE Inc. unless otherwise indicated. All global rights are reserved. All trademarks, logos, are copyrights of their respective owners.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No parts of this work covered by the copyright herein may be reproduced, transmitted, stored, or used in any form or by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, scanning, digitizing, taping, Web distribution, information networks, social networks, information storage and retrieval systems, or broadcast for distance learning, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the Global Entrepreneurship Institute.


What is copyright?

Copyright is the legal right of creators of “original works of authorship” that have been fixed in a tangible medium of expression, which include literary, dramatic, musical, artistic and certain other creative works, both published and unpublished.

Copyright law provides the following exclusive rights for copyright owners:
– to reproduce all or part of the copyrighted work
– to prepare derivative versions based on the original copyrighted work
– to distribute copies of the copyrighted work to the public
– to perform or display the copyrighted work publicly Copyright law provides incentives for creating.

One of the incentives for creating music, literature and other works is being able to reap the financial benefits as the creator. Illegitimate distribution of copies may prevent the copyright holder from benefiting from the sale of legitimate copies of the product. Significantly fewer people would buy copies from the copyright holder if other copies were available cheaper or for free.

Copyright law gives a creator of music, literature and other works a limited monopoly to reproduce or distribute the created work. A person or entity is accused of copyright infringement when someone claims they violated copyright by copying part or all of a work without authorization or enabled other people to make such copies.

Copyright infringement actions do not require that you actually knew that the material was protected by copyright or that your use of the material violated federal law. Claims of ignorance cannot be used as a defense to direct copyright infringement. Contributory infringement is form of indirect infringement. Contributory infringement requires 1) knowledge of the infringing activity and 2) a material contribution—actual assistance or inducement—to the alleged violation.

Even though you may not actually make the illegal copy, providing assistance in locating unauthorized copies of music, literature or other works on download sites, server space or support for sites that do the above may be considered contributory infringement.

A cease and desist letter gives the recipient notice that someone believes you have infringed their copyright. If the materials that are the subject of the notice are in fact infringing, then you do have a duty to remove them, although there may be statutory provisions that protect you from a lawsuit if the materials were posted by someone else.

If you do not believe that the materials are infringing, or if you believe that you are making fair use of the materials, you may choose to take the risk of not removing the materials, but a lawsuit might follow. If the accuser obtains a court order, then you must take down the materials.


Permission To Use Material From Work

Permission is authorization to make a copy (printed or electronic) of material that is protected by copyright. Examples of copying for which permission is required include photocopying or re-publishing printed works, duplicating electronic products, posting material to a Web page and transmitting or broadcasting via cable or satellite.

Do you want to request permissions to use Global Entrepreneurship Institute content? If you wish to make a specific permissions request, carefully follow the information below.

Permission to photocopy or republish our original work may be obtained by submitting a written request to the Global Entrepreneurship Institute’s Permissions Department. Before submitting a request, please check if the material to be used is credited to another source. If so, permission must be obtained from the credited source rather than from Global Entrepreneurship Institute.

Requests for accessible digital files for students with print disabilities: Requests for accessible digital files or permission to scan a book for use by a print-disabled student may also be obtained by submitting a written request to the Global Entrepreneurship Institute’s Permissions Department.

REQUESTS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY THE DISABILITY SERVICE CENTER OF THE STUDENT’S SCHOOL.


Permissions Mailing Address:

Global Entrepreneurship Institute
Permissions Department
668 N. Coast Highway, Suite #254
Laguna Beach, CA 92651 USA

Please allow sufficient time when requesting permission. The more complete your request, the faster we will be able to process it.


Permission requests must contain the following information:

For requests to photocopy material:
- author and title of the work
– edition number
– copyright year
– exact material, INCLUDING PAGE NUMBERS, WEB PAGE URLs, for which permission is requested
– total number of printed copies
– purpose of reproduction; for classroom use, include the school, professor, course, and semester
– to whom material will be distributed

For requests to republish material in another work:
- author and title of the work
– edition number
– copyright year
– exact material, INCLUDING PAGE NUMBERS, WEB PAGE URLs, for which permission is requested
– author and title of the work in which the material will appear
– publisher and publication date of the work in which the material will appear
– format/media of the new work
– specific URL, hosting company, if applicable
– print run of the new work if hard copies made available
– purpose of republishing; for classroom use, include the school, professor, course, and semester
– to whom material will be distributed
– territory and languages in which the new work will be distributed

For requests for digital files for print-disabled students:
- author and title of the work
– edition number
– copyright year
– exact material, INCLUDING PAGE NUMBERS, WEB PAGE URLs, for which permission is requested
– certification that the digital file requested is for use by a student with a documented disability who has purchased a print copy of the book for use in a course


If you are interested in using our work other than above please Contact Us